ENTERTAINMENT | President Obama at the 2012 White House Correspondents’ Dinner

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The White House Correspondents’ Association (WHCA) is an organization of journalists who cover the White House and the President of the United States. The WHCA was founded in 1914 by journalists in response to an unfounded rumor that a Congressional committee would select which journalists could attend press conferences of President Woodrow Wilson. Among the issues handled by the WHCA are press access to the President and physical conditions in White House press briefing rooms.
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The WHCA’s annual dinner, begun in 1920, has become a Washington, D.C. tradition and is usually attended by the President and Vice President. Fifteen presidents have attended a WHCA dinner, beginning with Calvin Coolidge in 1924. The dinner is traditionally held on the evening of the last Saturday in April at the Washington Hilton.

Prior to World War II, the annual dinner featured singing between courses, a homemade movie and an hour-long, post-dinner show with big-name performers.” In recent years the featured speaker has often been a comedian, with the dinner taking on the form of a roast, especially of the President.

In several recent years, the dinner has fallen shortly after major national events and tragedies, such as the Oklahoma City bombing (1995), the Siege at Waco, Texas (1993), the Columbine shooting (1999), and the Virginia Tech Massacre (2007), thus dampening the spirit of the event. The 2010 edition saw news of an attempted bombing in Times Square. The 2011 edition came on the heels of the deadliest tornado outbreak since 1925. However, this event was followed immediately by the announcement that the United States Military had killed Osama Bin Laden, and President Obama had even changed his own speech to reflect the operation, which he knew would soon be underway.

Real Estate | Foreclosure Eviction Timeline

The Foreclosure Procedure Includes Five (5) Events

Event 1: Missing a Single Payment – The foreclosure procedure may begin when you miss a single monthly mortgage loan payment (delinquency). A lender or its servicing agent is required to contact the homeowner 30 days in advance if initiating foreclosure.

Event 2: Notice of Default (-NOD-) – The recording of the NOD officially begins the foreclosure procedure. You will receive a copy of the NOD by certified postage prepaid mail. After the NOD is recorded, an initial minimum three month period is required to provide you with the opportunity of curing the default and reinstating your mortgage loan.

Event 3: End of the Initial Three Month Reinstatement or Cure Period – Your lender can schedule the foreclosure sale of your home.
Event 4: Notice of Sale (-NOS-) – The NOS is posted on your home and published in an authorized newspaper of general circulation in the jurisdiction where the foreclosure sale is to occur.

Event 5: Foreclosure Sale – When your home sells at the foreclosure sale, the lender may elect to accept the sale proceeds as payment in full.

Possible Alternatives or Options to Foreclosure

• Modify or restructure the terms and payment schedule of your existing mortgage loan
• Refinance
• Pursue a -short sale-

Real Estate | Preventing Foreclosure

The Foreclosure Procedure Includes Five (5) Events

Event 1: Missing a Single Payment – The foreclosure procedure may begin when you miss a single monthly mortgage loan payment (delinquency). A lender or its servicing agent is required to contact the homeowner 30 days in advance if initiating foreclosure.

Event 2: Notice of Default (-NOD-) – The recording of the NOD officially begins the foreclosure procedure. You will receive a copy of the NOD by certified postage prepaid mail. After the NOD is recorded, an initial minimum three month period is required to provide you with the opportunity of curing the default and reinstating your mortgage loan.

Event 3: End of the Initial Three Month Reinstatement or Cure Period – Your lender can schedule the foreclosure sale of your home.
Event 4: Notice of Sale (-NOS-) – The NOS is posted on your home and published in an authorized newspaper of general circulation in the jurisdiction where the foreclosure sale is to occur.

Event 5: Foreclosure Sale – When your home sells at the foreclosure sale, the lender may elect to accept the sale proceeds as payment in full.

Possible Alternatives or Options to Foreclosure

• Modify or restructure the terms and payment schedule of your existing mortgage loan
• Refinance
• Pursue a -short sale-

Real Estate | Stopping Foreclosure

The Foreclosure Procedure Includes Five (5) Events

Event 1: Missing a Single Payment – The foreclosure procedure may begin when you miss a single monthly mortgage loan payment (delinquency). A lender or its servicing agent is required to contact the homeowner 30 days in advance if initiating foreclosure.

Event 2: Notice of Default (-NOD-) – The recording of the NOD officially begins the foreclosure procedure. You will receive a copy of the NOD by certified postage prepaid mail. After the NOD is recorded, an initial minimum three month period is required to provide you with the opportunity of curing the default and reinstating your mortgage loan.

Event 3: End of the Initial Three Month Reinstatement or Cure Period – Your lender can schedule the foreclosure sale of your home.
Event 4: Notice of Sale (-NOS-) – The NOS is posted on your home and published in an authorized newspaper of general circulation in the jurisdiction where the foreclosure sale is to occur.

Event 5: Foreclosure Sale – When your home sells at the foreclosure sale, the lender may elect to accept the sale proceeds as payment in full.

Possible Alternatives or Options to Foreclosure

• Modify or restructure the terms and payment schedule of your existing mortgage loan
• Refinance
• Pursue a -short sale-

Real Estate | Foreclosure Process Timeline

The Foreclosure Procedure Includes Five (5) Events

Event 1: Missing a Single Payment – The foreclosure procedure may begin when you miss a single monthly mortgage loan payment (delinquency). A lender or its servicing agent is required to contact the homeowner 30 days in advance if initiating foreclosure.

Event 2: Notice of Default (-NOD-) – The recording of the NOD officially begins the foreclosure procedure. You will receive a copy of the NOD by certified postage prepaid mail. After the NOD is recorded, an initial minimum three month period is required to provide you with the opportunity of curing the default and reinstating your mortgage loan.

Event 3: End of the Initial Three Month Reinstatement or Cure Period – Your lender can schedule the foreclosure sale of your home.
Event 4: Notice of Sale (-NOS-) – The NOS is posted on your home and published in an authorized newspaper of general circulation in the jurisdiction where the foreclosure sale is to occur.

Event 5: Foreclosure Sale – When your home sells at the foreclosure sale, the lender may elect to accept the sale proceeds as payment in full.

Possible Alternatives or Options to Foreclosure

• Modify or restructure the terms and payment schedule of your existing mortgage loan
• Refinance
• Pursue a -short sale-

Real Estate | California Foreclosure Process

The Foreclosure Procedure Includes Five (5) Events

Event 1: Missing a Single Payment – The foreclosure procedure may begin when you miss a single monthly mortgage loan payment (delinquency). A lender or its servicing agent is required to contact the homeowner 30 days in advance if initiating foreclosure.

Event 2: Notice of Default (-NOD-) – The recording of the NOD officially begins the foreclosure procedure. You will receive a copy of the NOD by certified postage prepaid mail. After the NOD is recorded, an initial minimum three month period is required to provide you with the opportunity of curing the default and reinstating your mortgage loan.

Event 3: End of the Initial Three Month Reinstatement or Cure Period – Your lender can schedule the foreclosure sale of your home.
Event 4: Notice of Sale (-NOS-) – The NOS is posted on your home and published in an authorized newspaper of general circulation in the jurisdiction where the foreclosure sale is to occur.

Event 5: Foreclosure Sale – When your home sells at the foreclosure sale, the lender may elect to accept the sale proceeds as payment in full.

Possible Alternatives or Options to Foreclosure

• Modify or restructure the terms and payment schedule of your existing mortgage loan
• Refinance
• Pursue a -short sale-

Real Estate | Foreclosure Timeline California

The Foreclosure Procedure Includes Five (5) Events

Event 1: Missing a Single Payment – The foreclosure procedure may begin when you miss a single monthly mortgage loan payment (delinquency). A lender or its servicing agent is required to contact the homeowner 30 days in advance if initiating foreclosure.

Event 2: Notice of Default (-NOD-) – The recording of the NOD officially begins the foreclosure procedure. You will receive a copy of the NOD by certified postage prepaid mail. After the NOD is recorded, an initial minimum three month period is required to provide you with the opportunity of curing the default and reinstating your mortgage loan.

Event 3: End of the Initial Three Month Reinstatement or Cure Period – Your lender can schedule the foreclosure sale of your home.
Event 4: Notice of Sale (-NOS-) – The NOS is posted on your home and published in an authorized newspaper of general circulation in the jurisdiction where the foreclosure sale is to occur.

Event 5: Foreclosure Sale – When your home sells at the foreclosure sale, the lender may elect to accept the sale proceeds as payment in full.

Possible Alternatives or Options to Foreclosure

• Modify or restructure the terms and payment schedule of your existing mortgage loan
• Refinance
• Pursue a -short sale-

Real Estate | Foreclosure Timeline

The Foreclosure Procedure Includes Five (5) Events

Event 1: Missing a Single Payment – The foreclosure procedure may begin when you miss a single monthly mortgage loan payment (delinquency). A lender or its servicing agent is required to contact the homeowner 30 days in advance if initiating foreclosure.

Event 2: Notice of Default (-NOD-) – The recording of the NOD officially begins the foreclosure procedure. You will receive a copy of the NOD by certified postage prepaid mail. After the NOD is recorded, an initial minimum three month period is required to provide you with the opportunity of curing the default and reinstating your mortgage loan.

Event 3: End of the Initial Three Month Reinstatement or Cure Period – Your lender can schedule the foreclosure sale of your home.
Event 4: Notice of Sale (-NOS-) – The NOS is posted on your home and published in an authorized newspaper of general circulation in the jurisdiction where the foreclosure sale is to occur.

Event 5: Foreclosure Sale – When your home sells at the foreclosure sale, the lender may elect to accept the sale proceeds as payment in full.

Possible Alternatives or Options to Foreclosure

• Modify or restructure the terms and payment schedule of your existing mortgage loan
• Refinance
• Pursue a -short sale-

Real Estate | Short Sales Specialist

Short Sales Specialist Shares his Knowledge:

A short sale is a sale of real estate in which the proceeds from selling the property will fall short of the balance of debts secured by liens against the property and the property owner cannot afford to repay the liens’ full amounts, whereby the lien holders agree to release their lien on the real estate and accept less than the amount owed on the debt. Any unpaid balance owed to the creditors is known as a deficiency. Short sale agreements do not necessarily release borrowers from their obligations to repay any deficiencies of the loans, unless specifically agreed to between the parties.

A short sale is often used as an alternative to foreclosure because it mitigates additional fees and costs to both the creditor and borrower. While credit is also typically damaged much less than from a foreclosure, both often result in a negative credit report against the property owner.

In the United States, the Federal Trade Commission and individual states license and regulate debt negotiators and other consultants who, for a fee, advise borrowers and negotiate loan modifications with creditors on the borrower’s behalf. These consultants are required by various laws to disclose to borrowers the risks of renegotiating their mortgages and/or selling their property short. The federal government sanctions and recommends borrowers use only Department of Housing and Urban Development-approved non-profit organizations, which do not charge a fee for their services;however, such services rarely provide short sale negotiation services.

Private debt negotiators, who do short sale negotiations and also charge a fee for their service, are required in some states to be licensed, obtain a fidelity bond and insurance. They might also be limited to the amount they can charge and when these fees are due to be paid by the borrower. In many states real estate brokers, who handle a short sale application as part of their real estate services, are often allowed to do so without additional licensing or insurance.

A short sale negotiation resulting in a reduction of the amount a borrower owes towards a debt acts as a type of settlement or renegotiation of a borrower’s debt. Should the creditor report the debt reduction to credit reporting agencies, it can adversely affect a person’s credit report. Despite significant misreporting on the topic, damage to one’s credit due to a short sale is really no different than that of a foreclosure.[6] After a short sale, borrowers may find it difficult to obtain a new mortgage as lender’s underwriting guidelines might reject lending to a borrower who has obtained a short sale in the past.

As of 2011, national and state laws and industry standards for both real estate sales and lending are in an ongoing and rapid state of change. Borrowers interested in pursuing a short sale should consult first with a HUD-approved mortgage counselor for up-to-date and specific advice as it applies to their situation. Also, borrowers need to obtain up to date information from multiple professionals, including an accountant, an attorney, and a real estate broker—all of who specialize in loss mitigation and are licensed to practice in the state where the real estate is located.